Costa Rica To End Tradition of Caging Animals In Zoos By Next Year

The Ministry of Environment and Energy of Costa Rica (MINAE) has announced that the government will transform two of the nation’s largest zoos into botanical and urban

(Photo Courtesy - Eco Informativo).

Internationally recognized for its policies of environmental conservation, the Central American republic of 4.5 million in population remains 52.3% under forested coverage, with National Parks and reserves spanning approximately 30% of national territory. Sandwiched amid the ecological havens of Nicaragua and Panamá, the isthmus country furthermore hosts 4.5% of the planet’s biodiversity. (Photo CourtesyEco Informativo).

gardens, their mission being to eliminate the practice of caging animals and bring public awareness to biodiversity in its more natural state.

          Internationally recognized for its policies of environmental conservation, the Central American republic of 4.5 million in population remains 52.3% under forested coverage, with National Parks and reserves spanning approximately 30% of national territory. Sandwiched amid the ecological havens of Nicaragua and Panamá, the isthmus country furthermore hosts 4.5% of the planet’s biodiversity.

“The Ministry (of Environment and Energy) has the responsibility to respond to increasing environmental awareness of Costa Rica, which does not want to see animals sanctioned to cages. This is an old idea that no longer is popularly accepted with Costa Ricans, something we could have done before, but something never too late,” René Castro, Minister of Environment and Energy proclaimed.

(Photo Courtesy - Fecipa).

“The Ministry (of Environment and Energy) has the responsibility to respond to increasing environmental awareness of Costa Rica, which does not want to see animals sanctioned to cages. This is an old idea that no longer is popularly accepted with Costa Ricans, something we could have done before, but something never too late,” René Castro, Minister of Environment and Energy proclaimed. (Photo Courtesy – Fecipa).

Last week, Mrs. Castro and other governmental authorities stated during a press conference that the Conservation Center of Santa Ana, located west of the capital, and the Simón Bolívar Zoo, in central San José, will be responding to “a change of Costa Rican environmental awareness”, and “will be modified by May 14th, 2014”.

Transitioning Public Accessibility To Natural Wonders From Captivity To A Conveniently Accessible Natural State

Approximately 400 animals and 71 species of exotic mammals, birds, fish, and reptiles inhabit the famous Simón Bolívar Zoo alone, an institution established by decree in 1919 and made available to public access by 1921.

Since its inaugural opening, it has hosted local endangered fauna such as the jaguar, puma, macaw, crocodile, flamingo, tapir, deer and monkeys, as well as species from abroad, such as the giraffe and African lion.

(Photo Courtesy - Villas Costa Rica).

Unable to search out homes for all animals currently residing in the two zoos, the government will take them into care through the National System of Conservation Areas. For others under proper conditions, they will be relocated with the assistance of NGOs to animal rescue centers or to a variety of the nation’s extensive and remote National Parks. (Photo CourtesyVillas Costa Rica).

Unable to search out homes for all animals currently residing in the two zoos, the government will take them into care through the National System of Conservation Areas. For others under proper conditions, they will be relocated with the assistance of NGOs to animal rescue centers or to a variety of the nation’s extensive and remote National Parks.

Meanwhile, the substantial project and undertaking of transforming the zoos will be placed into the hands of the Fundazoo Foundation, which aims to establish new inner-city parks dedicated to scientific research and education, opening to the public an environment which seeks to attract the abundance of native fauna to the grounds in place of caging them.

(c) 2013 Latin America Now.Inc

LatinAmericaNow.com | Date: 07/31/2013

Cuba: Raul Castro Pledges “Gradual and Orderly” Transaction of Authority To Future Generations During 60th Anniversary of Moncada Barracks Attack

“The years have gone by, but this continues to be as much a revolution of young people as we were on July 26, 1953” said Raul, 82, in the eastern city of Santiago de Cuba,

(Photo Courtesy - MercoPress).

Wearing full military uniform and a hat to protect him from the torrid sun Raul Castro said that the revolution was preparing for an ‘orderly and gradual’ transfer of power to the new generations, but also warned that that success depends in the commitment “to above all preserver the unity of all deserving Cubans”. (Photo CourtesyMercoPress).

referring to the failed attack older brother Fidel Castro led against the Moncada army barracks 60 years ago.

Fidel considered the father of the Cuban revolution and who had ruled the islands since 1959, stepped down because of frail health in 2006 when the has 80, and left the post for his brother Raul.

Wearing full military uniform and a hat to protect him from the torrid sun Raul Castro said that the revolution was preparing for an ‘orderly and gradual’ transfer of power to the new generations, but also warned that that success depends in the commitment “to above all preserver the unity of all deserving Cubans”.

 Solid Alliances and Words of Change 

(Photo Courtesy - Juventud Rebelde; Cuba).

Joining Raul Castro for the occasion were the presidents of Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro; Bolivia, Evo Morales; Nicaragua, Daniel Ortega; Uruguay, Jose Mujica, along with the leaders of several Caribbean island nations and an estimated crowd of 10.000. (Photo Courtesy - Juventud Rebelde; Cuba).

Joining Raul Castro for the occasion were the presidents of Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro; Bolivia, Evo Morales; Nicaragua, Daniel Ortega; Uruguay, Jose Mujica, along with the leaders of several Caribbean island nations and an estimated crowd of 10.000.

All leaders present with the exception of Uruguay’s Mujica belong to ALBA (Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our America), the brain child of former Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez, and which also includes the Caribbean states of Antigua and Barbuda, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Dominica and Saint Lucia. Only absent was Rafael Correa from Ecuador, represented by his Foreign minister Ricardo Patiño.

(Photo Courtesy - Radio Miami).

All leaders present with the exception of Uruguay’s Mujica belong to ALBA (Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our America), the brain child of former Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez, and which also includes the Caribbean states of Antigua and Barbuda, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Dominica and Saint Lucia. Only absent was Rafael Correa from Ecuador, represented by his Foreign minister Ricardo Patiño. (Photo CourtesyRadio Miami).

“The struggle of the Cuban people has never been wrong; the Cuban revolution is the mother of all anti-imperialist revolutions in America and the world”, said Bolivia’s Morales.

Nicaragua’s Ortega praises the ‘inspiration’ and ‘moral force’ of the Cuban revolution, and Venezuela’s Maduro said of his delegation: “here stand the children of Chavez and the Cuban revolution”.

“The generation that led the revolution is giving way to new ones in peace and with serene confidence“ said Raul after recalling that over 70% of today’s Cubans were born after 1959.

History and Times of Transition

(Photo Courtesy - Absolute Cuba)

Castro has not hidden the fact that one of his concerns is assuring a generational change that guarantees the future of the revolution. (Photo Courtesy – Absolute Cuba)

Raul Castro was formally designated as Cuba’s president in 2008, was ratified in February for what is to be his second, and final, five-year mandate by virtue of his decision to limit himself and other senior figures to 10 years in office.

Castro has not hidden the fact that one of his concerns is assuring a generational change that guarantees the future of the revolution.

In February, he named Miguel Diaz-Canel, 52, as Cuba’s vice president, a decision Castro called ”a defining step in planning which way the country will go in the future.”

(Photo Courtesy (cc) Library of Congress).

Fidel considered the father of the Cuban revolution and who had ruled the islands since 1959, stepped down because of frail health in 2006 when the has 80, and left the post for his brother Raul. (Photo Courtesy (cc) Library of Congress).

The 1952 attack on the Moncada barracks was a military and political disaster with most young revolutionaries involved killed in battle, shot on the spot, captured and tortured. Fidel was lucky: he was found hiding in a truck and saved by a black Cuban army sergeant who has worked in the estate of his father, a Spanish immigrant who became a wealthy landholder and sugar cane planter.

Source: MercoPress

ANNOUCEMENT: NEW Instant-Access Interactivity Options To LATIN AMERICA NOW’s Most Popular Topics (CONTUNIOUSLY UPDATING)

Introducing Latin America Now’s newly released, instant-access interactivity options making it furthermore easy for any visitor, new or old, to access the news site’s most popular topics.

Topics will over time update in order to better fit popular trends and trans-Latin American and Caribbean events.

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3 Million Bid Farewell To Pope Francis At Closing Mass In Rio de Janeiro

Approximately three million attendees bid farewell to Pope Francis at the Sunday sermon on the final day of his week-long pilgrimage to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil where he

(Photo Courtesy - El País España).

The pope urged the youth to “advance beyond their comfort zones” to assist in the “rebuilding of the church”, referencing various religious analysts who state numerous of the young generations have “lost faith” and “grown out of touch”. Such is claimed to have resulted in the loss of followers by the millions, a trend readily observable in Brazil where Catholicism once indubitably dominated. (Photo CourtesyEl País España).

attended the World Youth Day celebrations and spoke daily against intolerance, selfishness, and hatred.

“Bringing the Gospel is bringing God’s power to rip out and raze evil and violence, to destroy and demolish the barrier of selfishness, intolerance and hatred to build a new world,” the Argentine-born pontiff declared over the last gathering of multitudes which stood across the city’s famed Copacabana beach. He then called upon the crowds to “shake the church, go spread the word of God!”

The pope urged the youth to “advance beyond their comfort zones” to assist in the “rebuilding of the church”, referencing various religious analysts who state numerous of the young generations have “lost faith” and “grown out of touch”. Such is claimed to have resulted in the loss of followers by the millions, a trend readily observable in Brazil where Catholicism once indubitably dominated.

(Photo Courtesy - AP).

“Bringing the Gospel is bringing God’s power to rip out and raze evil and violence, to destroy and demolish the barrier of selfishness, intolerance and hatred to build a new world,” the Argentine-born pontiff declared over the last gathering of multitudes which stood across the city’s famed Copacabana beach. He then called upon the crowds to “shake the church, go spread the word of God!” (Photo CourtesyAP).

Among those attending the final day of the Pope’s visit were heads of state and additional officials from across the South American continent, most notably including Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, Evo Morales of Bolivia, Cristina Fernandez of Argentina, and Vice President Danilo Astori of Uruguay.

President-elect of Paraguay, Horacio Cartes, was also invited by the Brazilian head of state, but was an invitation refused as the incumbent Paraguayan President, Federico Franco, failed to be invited by protocol.

(Photo Courtesy - Andina Perú).

Among those attending the final day of the Pope’s visit were heads of state and additional officials from across the South American continent, most notably including Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, Evo Morales of Bolivia, Cristina Fernandez of Argentina, and Vice President Danilo Astori of Uruguay. (Photo Courtesy - Andina Perú).

Throughout the  five day tour, Pope Francis emphasized numerous subjects, ranging from drug-legislation in the region to encouraging religious figures to abandon “the princely attitude” and “go out to the people (saving the church)”. He further condemned the global “cult of money” and “culture of disposal” and ultimately declared that “money has to serve, not to rule”.

(c) 2013 Latin America Now.Inc

LatinAmericaNow.com | Date: 07/30/2013

Thousands of Colombian Peasant Farmers In Catatumbo Request Resumption Of Talks With Government Amid Violent Protests and Conflict

Peasant farmers of the Catatumbo region, in the department of Norte de Santander, who today mark their 46th day of protest, have announced the desire to

(Photo Courtesy - La F.M.).

Confronted with distinct land and humanitarian rights issues, the Catatumbo region is considered among the most troubled sectors in the northern South American republic with minimum presence of state institutions and aid. (Photo CourtesyTeleSur).

resume dialogues with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos in order to reach vital agreements and declare a state of social emergency in the northern Colombian region.

          During the reading of a letter publicized at a press conference held by the Rural Press Agency, the Peasant Association of Cataumbo (ASCAMCAT) have solicited the head of state to receive a delegation of farmers who will offer several proposals to help exit the humanitarian crisis currently being faced.

Confronted with distinct land and humanitarian rights issues, the Catatumbo region is considered among the most troubled sectors in the northern South American republic with minimum presence of state

(Photo Courtesy - Aporrea).

The desire to rectify what has been perceived by much of the residential population as “unjust” climaxed when a peaceful demonstration over the increase of autonomy, humanitarian aid and alternative revenues of coca cultivation turned violent after it was reported, and later proven, that police were killing numerous of the unarmed peasants present. (Photo CourtesyAporrea).

institutions and aid. In this area, local poverty stands at 73% to 90% of the population with less than 30% literate, only 23% with access to potable water and internet availability at a mere 1.21%. While infrastructure and poverty remain prevalent, the region is rich in natural resources with 300,000,000 tons of carbon reservoirs and 1,700,000,000 tested barrels of petroleum.

The desire to rectify what has been perceived by much of the residential population as “unjust” climaxed when a peaceful demonstration over the increase of autonomy, humanitarian aid and alternative revenues of coca cultivation turned violent after it was reported, and later proven, that police were killing numerous of the unarmed peasants present.

(Photo Courtesy - Alerta Roja).

In direct response, over 14,000 peasants took to the streets on the 10th of June and further demanded the original propositions as well as the achievement of a rural development plan for an economically viable alternative to the production of coca and the declaration of a peasant farmer reservation zoon (ZRC). (Photo CourtesyAlerta Roja).

In direct response, over 14,000 peasants took to the streets on the 10th of June and further demanded the original propositions as well as the achievement of a rural development plan for an economically viable alternative to the production of coca and the declaration of a peasant farmer reservation zoon (ZRC).

Tensions birthed from the demonstrations have since augmented with further clashes between local residents and police forces, including incidents of police repression toward foreign journalists attempting to cover the event as witnessed with Vladimir Carrillo of the Venezuelan-Trans Latin American broadcasting network, TeleSur.

The incidents have ignited further pressure to establish peace dialogues between the peasants and the government in hopes to acheive a set of resolutions. The latest round of talks, which took place last week,

(Photo Courtesy - El Tiempo).

“The farmers lost the opportunity (to negotiation) and therefore we will hold no more conversations in Catatumbo,” stated the Vice President subsequent to departing from the talks. (Photo CourtesyEl Tiempo).

entered a stalemate after a long meeting held among official peasant farmers’ delegations and Vice President Angelino Garzón where both parties did not reach any agreement.

During the meeting, Mr. Garzón, along with additional governmental representatives, insisted that roadblocks instituted by the farmers be lifted. Nevertheless, the peasants reiterated that the complete clearing of the highway, which connects the cities of Cúcuta and Tibú, would be made upon the successful negotiation of some of their demands.

“The farmers lost the opportunity (to negotiation) and therefore we will hold no more conversations in Catatumbo,” stated the Vice President subsequent to departing from the talks.

(Photo Courtesy - Tercera Información España).

Peasants now fear further reprisals by the authorities, military, mobile riot squads and police, who amid clashes have caused four fatalitiess and over sixty gravely injured. Their request at continued negotiations has garnered no further response (Photo CourtesyTercera Información España).

Peasants now fear further reprisals by the authorities, military, mobile riot squads and police, who amid clashes have caused four fatalitiess and over sixty gravely injured. Their request at continued negotiations has garnered no further response.

(c) 2013 Latin America Now.Inc

LatinAmericaNow.com | Date: 07/30/2013

Liverpool Striker and Uruguayan Soccer Player, Luis Suárez Mocks Himself On New TV Commercial

The 26-year-old Liverpool striker and Uruguayan soccer player, Luis Suárez, has starred as himself in the Uruguayan company Abitab’s latest

(Photo Courtesy (cc) Zimbio).

Originally publicized on the 15th of July, the video’s online version released via YouTube currently sports over one million two hundred sixty thousand views with 6,544 likes and 171 dislikes, being declared an Uruguayan YouTube “hit” by numerous sports commentary sources upon a national and international front. (Photo CourtesyClive Rose/Getty Images Europe).

commercial in which he parodies his notorious personality as an international football player both famed for scoring as well as a tarnishing reputation as a troublemaker.

          Originally publicized on the 15th of July, the video’s online version released via YouTube currently sports over one million two hundred sixty thousand views with 6,544 likes and 171 dislikes, being declared an Uruguayan YouTube “hit” by numerous sports commentary sources upon a national and international front.

          The 54-second commercial, aired on nationwide television throughout the sport celebrity’s home country, demonstrates numerous attitudes that have penalized him on the soccer field. However, in the ad, the footballer is a social worker in a 9 to 5 office environment.

Emphasizing short-coming qualities such as quick temper, excessive competitiveness, annoying behavior, pretender of faults, practitioner of unorthodox measures and sporadically vehement nature upon dealing with others, the televised spot sports these

(Screen Shot Photo Courtesy - Abitab Uruguay).

The 54-second commercial, aired on nationwide television throughout the sport celebrity’s home country, demonstrates numerous attitudes that have penalized him on the soccer field. However, in the ad, the footballer is a social worker in a 9 to 5 office environment. (Screen Shot Photo CourtesyAbitab Uruguay).

qualities in an upfront, nevertheless humorous, light. The video ends on the note, “yet all love him”, allegedly demonstrating that Mr. Suárez “is also a generous and good person, apart from a person able to laugh at his own shortcomings”, according to the Spanish-language sports news agency, Mundo Deportivo.

Bitings and Bannings 

Last season, the Uruguayan striker was subject to a large variety of popular criticisms, from more minor gestures such as those of non-commitment and lack of etiquette, to those more extreme, such as allegations of racism (such as with Manchester United’s Patrice Evra), and most recently for biting the arm of Serbian player, Branislav Ivanovic of Chelsea.

(Photo Courtesy - CNN: World Sports).

Last season, the Uruguayan striker was subject to a large variety of popular criticisms, from more minor gestures such as those of non-commitment and lack of etiquette, to those more extreme, such as allegations of racism (such as with Manchester United’s Patrice Evra), and most recently for biting the arm of Serbian player, Branislav Ivanovic of Chelsea. (Photo CourtesyCNN: World Sports).

This proved to be the second incident of the same type in Mr. Suárez’s 8-year long career.

This summer, there has been extensive speculation regarding the striker’s possible departure from the Liverpool team. Real Madrid, openly the preferred team of the player, appeared once the fate. However the transfer failed subsequent to a ten game ban Mr. Suárez has experienced since the latest “shortcoming”.

*(Below Are Featured the (1) Official Luis Suárez Abitab Commercial (IN SPANISH) and (2) Footage of Biting Serbian Football Player, Branislav Ivanovic):

(c) 2013 Latin America Now.Inc

LatinAmericaNow.com | Date: 07/29/2013

Brazil/Argentina Trade Disputes Achieved ‘Furious Levels’ During Latest Mercosur Summit In Montevideo, Uruguay

International issues helped Mercosur to close ranks and give a false image of unity during the last summit held in Uruguay, according to

(Photo Courtesy (cc)

In effect the dispute was again referred to intra-Mercosur trade with Brazil demanding a more flexible attitude from Argentina and the administrative measures implemented by Cristina Fernandez administration which delay and discourage trade. (Photo Courtesy (cc) Dilma Rousseff Official Flicker).

diplomatic sources in Montevideo that are surfacing details of a bitter exchange behind doors between Argentina’s Cristina Fernandez and Brazil’s Dilma Rousseff.

In effect the dispute was again referred to intra-Mercosur trade with Brazil demanding a more flexible attitude from Argentina and the administrative measures implemented by Cristina Fernandez administration which delay and discourage trade.

President Rousseff argued as it has done in other meetings that Argentina should give Mercosur partners a better deal and not enforce the regime that demands sworn statements on planned imports and which according to business people the paperwork can take from a few days to months, contrary to normal trade relations.

President Cristina Fernandez, with no reserves and despite the fact that all Mercosur and associate member presidents were in the meeting together with their ministerial support, said point blank that Argentina will not change its trade policies geared to promote domestic industry and consumption, and to contain the outflow of dollars from the country.

Despite the Brazilian president displaying ‘infinite patience’, Uruguayan president Jose Mujica and at times Bolivian president Evo Morales had to intervene on several occasions to try and contain the ‘heated at times furious’ ladies’ exchange, said diplomatic sources in Montevideo.

Brazil has seen its sales to Argentina drop significantly since the latest protectionist measures implemented, apparently to the benefit of cheaper Asian produce, and Brazilian industry lobbies are putting pressure on President Rousseff to find a solution to the problem.

(Photo Courtesy (cc) (Mujica - Roosewelt Pinheiro; Morale - Simon Wedege).

Despite the Brazilian president displaying ‘infinite patience’, Uruguayan president Jose Mujica and at times Bolivian president Evo Morales had to intervene on several occasions to try and contain the ‘heated at times furious’ ladies’ exchange, said diplomatic sources in Montevideo. (Photo Courtesy (cc) (MujicaRoosewelt Pinheiro;MoralesSimon Wedege).

This is not the first time these kind of backdoor clashes happen. In another summit in 2011, Brazil proposed a special regime to liberalize Mercosur intra-trade with free movement of produce and people, but Argentina was adamant to the fury of the administration of president Rousseff.

However at the time it was agreed to name a High Level Group to try and channel trade differences and advance in making an effective although precarious free market. Obviously the high level group was stalled from the start and was followed by tit-for-tat customs measures from both sides.

In Montevideo the two ladies finally lowered the tone of the discussion and a consensus whitewashed release that reiterates the intention of continuing to advance in “facilitating intra-zone trade, reduction of asymmetries, access to financing and integration of productive structures”.

Nevertheless in the open session Brazilian president Rousseff addressing her peers insisted in “the promotion of an external insertion agenda which contemplates faster chronograms for trade negotiations with other countries of the region, the European Union and the promotion of agreements with our African brothers, looking to implement a special trade policy”.

(Photo Courtesy (cc) Vince Alongi).

This is not the first time these kind of backdoor clashes happen. In another summit in 2011, Brazil proposed a special regime to liberalize Mercosur intra-trade with free movement of produce and people, but Argentina was adamant to the fury of the administration of president Rousseff. (Photo Courtesy (cc) Vince Alongi).

Regarding the next round of strategic association and free trade negotiations with the EU, Uruguay said it had ‘concluded’ the list goods and services to propose in the talks; Brazil admitted its proposal list was ‘almost ready’ and Argentina pledged to have it ready ‘with sufficient time’ so that Mercosur can agree and present an only list.

But whatever the differences and the intensity of the dispute, at the end of the day there was ample space to criticize the ‘neo-colonialist’ attitude of European countries that prevented Bolivian president Morales from over-flying several countries; to blast the US over the revelations of leaker Edward Snowden about spying Brazil, Argentina and other Latam countries and finally the right of Latam countries to offer political asylum with no conditions or threats from Washington. Aye. Aye.

Source: MercoPress

SUNDAY WEEKLY QUOTE: Ex-President Hugo Chávez On Society and Genuine Peace

Millions of Venezuelans and South Americans commemorate today the 28th of July to the 59th Birthday of late President of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and Leader of the Bolivarian Revolution, Hugo Chávez [(Sabaneta, Barinas, Venezuela) July 28th, 1954 - March 5th, 2013 (Caracas, Venezuela)].

*07/28/2013: (The “Sunday Weekly Quote” is a weekly quote hailing from Latin American history, literature, philosophy, art or an important news event of the week. Also found on Latin America Now’s official Facebook and Twitter page).

*Millions Across Latin America Commemorate. Footage, Achive Imagery and Spanish-Language News Clip by TeleSUR Noticias:

28TH of JULY: INDEPENDANCE DAY of the REPUBLIC of PERÚ

Today, the 28th of July marks the 192nd national Day of Independance of Perú, the South American republic being declared free from the Spanish Empire by among its most prominent Liberators, José de San Martín in 1821.

SATURDAY SPECIAL: WEEKLY VIDEO: The War On Democracy (2007) by John Pilger Official Trailer

*FULL FILM Can Be Viewed For Free on John Pilger’s Official Website Outlet For The Documentary: http://johnpilger.com/videos/the-war-on-democracy

*DESCRIPTION: “The War On Democracy (2007) was John Pilger’s first for cinema. It explores the current and past relationship of Washington with Latin American countries such as Venezuela, Bolivia and Chile.

Using archive footage sourced by Michael Moore’s archivist Carl Deal, the film shows how serial US intervention, overt and covert, has toppled a series of legitimate governments in the Latin American region since the 1950s. The democratically elected Chilean government of Salvador Allende, for example, was ousted by a US backed coup in 1973 and replaced by the military dictatorship of General Pinochet. Guatemala, Panama, Nicaragua, Honduras and El Salvador have all been invaded by the United States.

John Pilger interviews several ex-CIA agents who took part in secret campaigns against democratic countries in the region. He investigates the School of the Americas in the US state of Georgia, where Pinochet’s torture squads were trained along with tyrants and death squad leaders in Haiti, El Salvador, Brazil and Argentina.

The film unearths the real story behind the attempted overthrow of Venezuela’s President Hugo Chávez in 2002 and how the people of the barrios of Caracas rose up to force his return to power.

It also looks at the wider rise of populist governments across South America lead by indigenous leaders intent on loosening the shackles of Washington and a fairer redistribution of the continent’s natural wealth.

John Pilger says: “[The film] is about the struggle of people to free themselves from a modern form of slavery”. These people, he says, “describe a world not as American presidents like to see it as useful or expendable, they describe the power of courage and humanity among people with next to nothing. They reclaim noble words like democracy, freedom, liberation, justice, and in doing so they are defending the most basic human rights of all of us in a war being waged against all of us.”

‘The War On Democracy’ was a Youngheart Entertainment, Granada and Michael Watt production. It was released in UK cinemas on 15 June 2007 and broadcast on ITV1, 20 August 2007. Directors: John Pilger and Chris Martin. Producers: Chris Martin and Wayne Young. Editor: Joe Frost. The film was made with the support of the humanitarian financier Michael Watt.

Awards: Best Documentary Award, 2008 One World Awards, London. The panel’s citation read: “There are six criteria the judges are asked to use to select the winner of this award: the film’s impact on public opinion, its appeal to a wide audience, its inclusion of voices from the developing world, its high journalistic or production standards, its success in conveying the impact of the actions of the world’s rich on the lives of the poor and the extent to which it draws attention to possible solutions. One film met every one of these. It was the winner of the award: John Pilger’s ‘The War on Democracy’.” - http://johnpilger.com/

*Visit John Pilger’s Offical Website For More Inspiring Documentaries and Continually Updating News On Related Topics from Today and Yesterday:

http://johnpilger.com/

*07/26/2013 (The Saturday Special: Weekly Video shares a video clip once a week every Saturday which aims to repressent Latin America through music, culture, history, film, news, art,etc… Also found on Latin America Now’s official Facebook and Twitter page).

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